32412 Hauptseminar

AI Technology and U.S. Foreign Relations

Jessica Gienow-Hecht

Kommentar

This seminar constitutes the second part (Hauptseminar) of Module A (America in the World). While the first part of the module (Seminar) is designed as a broad introduction to the period by looking at a general theme, the second part zooms in on a specific topic, offering students the opportunity to do in-depth reading, primary source research and write a paper. Both parts are scheduled back to back (Tues., 8:30-10am, 10-12pm). Students required to complete the full module are encouraged to enroll in both courses simultaneously. Students wishing to compose a full research paper (Hausarbeit) at the end of the term are strongly encouraged to enrol in this seminar (Hauptseminar), i.e. the second of Module A. Theme: Artificial intelligence (AI) arguably constitutes one of the foremost challenges facing humanity – and, with that, the humanities – today. Stephen Hawking, Bill Gates, and Elon Musk have all claimed that without the proper mechanisms of control, Artificial Intelligence may pose an existential threat to humanity; others, meanwhile, have hailed AI’s potential, to improve the quality of human life. Recent and not so recent advances in artificial intelligence (AI) have placed new concerns on the international agenda, revised geostrategic relations, operated as an instrument for diplomats and policy makers while also devising new challenges and opportunities about peace, international cooperation, security control and concerns about human rights. This course will examine the history of artificial intelligence in the United States with a particular focus on the post-World War Two foreign relations. Spurred by unprecedented government funding during the Cold War, in the 1950s, a group of professors and students at MIT and Dartmouth set out to craft and expand what seemed to many an unprecedented field of inquiry. Cast as a tool to enhance defense and control, AI research quickly developed, in the public eye, a life on its own when artists and writers began to pitch visions of a posthuman future raising daunting questions about the “humanity” and “otherness” of AI. The purpose of the course is to ask how AI technology has historically come about and how it has affected U.S. foreign relations, notably the work of governmental officials, diplomats, policy makers and NGOs involved in international affairs. Course Structure: This is a research-oriented learning course, designed to encourage students to explore a specific field and topic from an inquisitive, problem-oriented and critical perspective and to work practically, autonomously and creatively. It focuses on a particular topic by proceeding in three steps: First, students will collectively examine, review and discuss some of the pertinent literature on this theme and, also, familiarize themselves themselves with current research methods, including digital work. Second, students will form small teams to collectively develop a research interest and a research question. Third, students will then proceed to prepare a thesis –either loosely connected to that of their team members of by working together on one larger paper. The course will be concluded with a series of team presentations pertaining to their respective research projects. Requirements: team leadership and research and discussion of primary sources (visual, text, sound); active class participation, preparation of reading & one question (in writing) per week to be posted on Blackboard. To obtain full credit, students will compose a full-length research paper (20-25pp.). Schließen

16 Termine

Regelmäßige Termine der Lehrveranstaltung

Di, 15.10.2019 10:00 - 12:00

Dozenten:
Univ.-Prof. Dr. Jessica Gienow-Hecht

Räume:
203 Seminarraum (Lansstr. 7 / 9)

Di, 22.10.2019 10:00 - 12:00

Dozenten:
Univ.-Prof. Dr. Jessica Gienow-Hecht

Räume:
203 Seminarraum (Lansstr. 7 / 9)

Di, 29.10.2019 10:00 - 12:00

Dozenten:
Univ.-Prof. Dr. Jessica Gienow-Hecht

Räume:
203 Seminarraum (Lansstr. 7 / 9)

Di, 05.11.2019 10:00 - 12:00

Dozenten:
Univ.-Prof. Dr. Jessica Gienow-Hecht

Räume:
203 Seminarraum (Lansstr. 7 / 9)

Di, 12.11.2019 10:00 - 12:00

Dozenten:
Univ.-Prof. Dr. Jessica Gienow-Hecht

Räume:
203 Seminarraum (Lansstr. 7 / 9)

Di, 19.11.2019 10:00 - 12:00

Dozenten:
Univ.-Prof. Dr. Jessica Gienow-Hecht

Räume:
203 Seminarraum (Lansstr. 7 / 9)

Di, 26.11.2019 10:00 - 12:00

Dozenten:
Univ.-Prof. Dr. Jessica Gienow-Hecht

Räume:
203 Seminarraum (Lansstr. 7 / 9)

Di, 03.12.2019 10:00 - 12:00

Dozenten:
Univ.-Prof. Dr. Jessica Gienow-Hecht

Räume:
203 Seminarraum (Lansstr. 7 / 9)

Di, 10.12.2019 10:00 - 12:00

Dozenten:
Univ.-Prof. Dr. Jessica Gienow-Hecht

Räume:
203 Seminarraum (Lansstr. 7 / 9)

Di, 17.12.2019 10:00 - 12:00

Dozenten:
Univ.-Prof. Dr. Jessica Gienow-Hecht

Räume:
203 Seminarraum (Lansstr. 7 / 9)

Di, 07.01.2020 10:00 - 12:00

Dozenten:
Univ.-Prof. Dr. Jessica Gienow-Hecht

Räume:
203 Seminarraum (Lansstr. 7 / 9)

Di, 14.01.2020 10:00 - 12:00

Dozenten:
Univ.-Prof. Dr. Jessica Gienow-Hecht

Räume:
203 Seminarraum (Lansstr. 7 / 9)

Di, 21.01.2020 10:00 - 12:00

Dozenten:
Univ.-Prof. Dr. Jessica Gienow-Hecht

Räume:
203 Seminarraum (Lansstr. 7 / 9)

Di, 28.01.2020 10:00 - 12:00

Dozenten:
Univ.-Prof. Dr. Jessica Gienow-Hecht

Räume:
203 Seminarraum (Lansstr. 7 / 9)

Di, 04.02.2020 10:00 - 12:00

Dozenten:
Univ.-Prof. Dr. Jessica Gienow-Hecht

Räume:
203 Seminarraum (Lansstr. 7 / 9)

Di, 11.02.2020 10:00 - 12:00

Dozenten:
Univ.-Prof. Dr. Jessica Gienow-Hecht

Räume:
203 Seminarraum (Lansstr. 7 / 9)

Studienfächer A-Z