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Digital*Humanities im Gespräch im Sommersemester 2021

29. April 2021: Thomas Stodulka: "Big Data and Complex Knowledge: Observations and Recommendations for Research from the Knowledge Complexity Project"

Online-Veranstaltung via Webex

(Vortrag in englischer Sprache)

The Knowledge Complexity (or KPLEX) project was created with a two-fold purpose: first, to expose potential areas of bias in big data research, and second, to do so using methods and challenges coming from a research community that has been relatively resistant to big data, namely the arts, the humanities, and the ethnographies. The project’s founding supposition was that there are practical and cultural reasons why humanities research resists datafication, a process generally understood as the substitution of original state research objects and processes for digital, quantified or otherwise more structured streams of information. The project’s further assumption was that these very reasons for resistance could be instructive for the critical observation of big data research and innovation as a whole. To understand clearly the features of humanistic and cultural data, approaches, methodologies, institutions and challenges is to see the fault lines where datafication and algorithmic parsing may fail to deliver on what they promise, or may hide the very insight they propose to expose. As such, the aim of the KPLEX project has been, from the outset, to pinpoint areas where different research communities’ understanding of what the creation of knowledge is and should be diverge, and, from this unique perspective, propose where further work can and should be done.

20. Mai 2021: Pia Janke, Sabrina Weinzettl, Tatjana Griessler und Matej Ďurčo: "'Jelinek online' - Zur Digitalisierung des Werk- und Rezeptionsverzeichnisses zu Elfriede Jelinek"

Online-Veranstaltung via Webex

Das Werk der österreichischen Literaturnobelpreisträgerin Elfriede Jelinek ist durch seinen Umfang, sein Gattungsspektrum und die Vielzahl an z. T. flüchtigen Publikationsformen eine besondere Herausforderung für die literaturwissenschaftliche Dokumentation und Erschließung.

Ausgehend von der 2014 in Printform erschienenen kommentierten Bibliographie Elfriede Jelinek: Werk und Rezeption erarbeitet das Elfriede Jelinek-Forschungszentrum in Kooperation mit dem Austrian Centre for Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage (ACDH-CH) der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften und dem Interuniversitären Forschungsverbund Elfriede Jelinek der Universität Wien sowie der Musik und Kunst Privatuniversität der Stadt Wien (MUK) das digitale Portal Jelinek online. Ziel ist es, sämtliche bibliographische Daten zu Elfriede Jelineks Werk und Rezeption als Open Access-Portal zugänglich zu machen, inhaltliche Vernetzungen innerhalb des Werks herzustellen sowie komplexe Suchmöglichkeiten zu eröffnen.

Im Rahmen des Vortrags werden die Arbeiten am Projekt präsentiert sowie Aspekte der digitalen Abbildung vernetzter Werkstrukturen mit Hilfe von Datenmodellen diskutiert.

17. Juni 2021: Howard Hotson und Thomas Wallnig: "Reassembling the Republic of Letters in the Digital Age, or: Networking to the Fourth Power"

Online-Veranstaltung via Webex

(Vortrag in englischer Sprache)

Between 2014 and 2019, a community of over 200 academics from more than 30 countries joined a European research network called Reassembling the Republic of Letters. The purpose of the exercise was to assemble an interdisciplinary network to design a networking platform to support a scholarly network studying past intellectual networks. With this purpose in mind, scholars, librarians and developers worked together towards a pair of complementary goals. One goal was technical: to negotiate the basis for a distributed digital infrastructure for studying early modern intellectual correspondence. The other goal was scholarly: to experiment with the new forms of collaborative scholarship which could emerge on such infrastructure to generate a polyphonic, transnational intellectual history of the early modern world. Both aspects are documented in a collaboratively written volume, published in 2019, which also relates individual historical case studies to a wide range of traditional methodological frameworks, from social history to the history of ideas. The paper will introduce the audience to the details of the book and the project underlying it, and discuss recent developments both in the field of infrastructure and in that of scholarly methodology.